Brewing a Berliner Weisse

NEVER Stop Learning!

Everytime I brew beer I learn something new… I improve on what I already know, but I learn something new…

I just did a review of my Berliner Weisse and I have to tell you I was a bit concerned for a while…

I kept wondering how fermentation was going to go if I didn’t aerate the wort…

Isn’t that what everyone teaches?

You get done boiling, and the first thing you do is aerate the wort…

Well as I talked about this last time, it turns out that bacteria thrive in a low oxygen, low pH environment…

So I went ahead and pitched just Lactobacillus Delbruckii to my wort to test it out…

Within a day I had a nice ring of KrĂ€usen and by Day 3 the Lacto was fermenting some sugars…

Some say that it takes up to 6 months to develop acidity, but 4 days actually developed quite a bit of acidity…

According to Jason Kahler from Solera Brewery, you can pitch lacto and within 7 days have the sourness you would normally get if you waited 6 months with traditional yeast + lacto blend…

I only did 4 days, so I’ll have to try this one again…

But… 4 days developed quite a bit of lactic acid and gave the beer a nice sourness…

I’m going to let this beer develop for about 4 to 6 months and maybe do a second beer review (I it’s not gone before then)

Another thing I wanted to talk about was pitching yeast into a non-aerated wort…

One thing I noticed with this beer was that I got no lag time for fermentation… lacto was already fermenting, but as soon as yeast went into the wort that activity increased… I’m talking within 20 to 30 minutes…

I was actually wondering if I had some wild yeast going crazy in there, but luckily there wasn’t…

Fermentation was actually very very clean… yeast character was very very clean…

The beer attenuated fully, there were no off-flavors created… no excess esters, in fact the esters were very subtle and clean…

I’m really marvelling about this beer, the process and the results because I really really think there is something here…

So stay tuned for more information as I experiment!

3 Comments

  • David Luedecke

    Reply Reply January 19, 2015

    As always, I learned so much from watching this video. I used to live in Arizona but recently moved to Kansas City. Will the cooler ambient temps affect this brew in any way?

    Thanks,

    • jorgitoz

      Reply Reply January 19, 2015

      Hi David!! It may just take longer for the bacteria to ferment… kind of like making sauerkraut. It ferments faster during the summer, longer during the winter 😉

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