Hop flavor and aroma can be one and the same, but there is a slight difference…

Aroma comes primarily from oils in the hops… bitterness comes primarily from the alpha acids…

… and hop flavor is some what a combination of the two…

A question was asked about the Hop Tea I made for my Pale Ale wondering if that would improve the aroma of the beer…

My answer was that for aroma you want to stick to Dry Hopping and other hopping techniques that don’t require heating up the hops…

Once you start to heat the hops, the aroma oils will be driven off and lost… when I made my hop tea the whole house smelled like hops…

… and I take that as smell I’ve lost that should have been in the glass when I serve my beer…

… but I did gain a hop flavor that you can’t get with either boiling, dry hopping or late kettle additions…

It is another tool to make unique beer…

Different yeast strains are supposed to have different effects on hop aroma through fermentation… some that ferment vigorously are said to drive off hop oils (aroma) because of the excess CO2 created…

I don’t know how true that is since I’ve only done a couple experiments, but I’ve yet to find how anyone is measuring the amount of aroma a beer gets based on hop additions…

For hop flavor, you don’t want to boil the hops… heating them much like you would if you were adding hops while cooling down your wort will tend to bring out a smooth flavor out of the hops…

I talk about various hop techniques in my Better Home Brew Formula Traning, but most importantly… how to think about hops so you know what to expect from all the crazy techniques some brewers come up with (me included)…


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