A smooth beer that starts out with a slight Pils malt sweetness but finishes dry with a smooth alcohol aftertaste… and I mean smooth…

The beer should have noble-hop-like spicy notes as well as some from the yeast along with fruity esters…

Belgian Blonde Recipe:
10.5 lbs of Belgian pilsner
.5 lbs of wheat malt
1 lb of cane sugar (I used golden brown on this one to experiment)

1 (3% AA) oz Czech Saaz (60 min)
1 (3% AA) oz Czech Saaz (30 min)

~ 240 billion yeast cells of WLP 500

RO water with 1.5 tsp of both Gypsum and Calcium Chloride

You want to do a single infusion mashed at 147 F for 90 minutes… a protein rest is not recommended with a well modified malt like this… in fact, the wheat malt is used to add a little bit of FAN for the yeast…

pH during the mash is very important when mashing low for fermentability so make sure you adjust your water and hit the right pH…

You can boil this for 60 or 90 minutes… I went for 90 to get more flavor development and avoid DMS from the Pils malt…

The process is simple, but any mistakes will show up in the finished beer… so just like being anal about mashing temperatures, fermentation temperature control is crucial for a good beer with this style…

It all starts with the yeast pitching rate… normally at a rate of 1 million cells per milliliter per degree plato you’d be looking at using roughly 300 billion cells… a lower amount of yeast cells will allow more phenolic notes and esters to develop during fermentation…

But this is only if you ferment at the right temperature and time it right… I fermented starting at 64 F for about 24 hours then let it raise in temperature up to 77 F…

blow off hoseTo avoid a mess with the increase in temperature I switched from an airlock to a blow off tube… that way the yeast can ferment as crazy as they want and not clog up the airlock…

I will probably transfer this beer into a keg in about 10 days…

there you have it… brewing a Belgian blonde

Cheers!


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