After the first brew comes out, it becomes an addiction… that’s what most new brewers report and soon after that the next question is, how can I brew more??

Some opt for the frequent brewing method…

Basically, as soon as the current batch is done fermenting and transferred to a secondary or bottled, they have another batch boiling…

Now that’s all good, but if you don’t have time, then you may want to cut down on the frequency and double up on your brewing size… 10 gallon batches instead of 5.

That was a question I came across a couple days ago. A home brewer figured that all they needed to do was double everything… double the ingredients, double the boiling times…

But that wasn’t the main problem… the main problem was that he only had the same pot he used to brew his five gallon batches and was wondering if he could boil 3 gallons with all the ingredients and then dilute to 10 gallon batches split in two carboys..

Wrong…

That would really mess up a brew…

First off, if you are using 6-8 pounds in 3 gallons of water that’s already a high gravity wort. Stuffing double that amount into 3 gallons would make it an uber high gravity wort. What that means is that you won’t get the same amount of bitterness out of hops and therefore will get a very malty tasting beer.

Also, by having such a high concentrated wort during the boil, you’ll increase your maillard reactions…

The reality is that a beer should ideally be boiled in it’s complete size… meaning you should boil all 5 gallons in a five gallon batch… reason why this is not possible in most cases it’s because some electric stoves don’t have the power to handle such task…

If you have a recipe and brew a good 5 gallonĀ  batch by boiling only 3 gallons, then doubling the batch size without changing the recipe means you’ll have to boil 6 gallons and then dilute.

Boiling times should remain the same (60 minutes) and ingredients will need to be doubled.

6 Gallons of wort would more than likely not be boiled well in an electric stove… chances are you’ll need to cook on gas…

Also, the hop schedule will need to remain the same… 60 minute hops remain 60 minute hops and not 120 minute hops just because you doubled the size of your batch…

If you don’t have a gas stove or other equipment to boil a good 6 gallon wort, then you may need to opt for method number 3…

Split your boil in two… Yep, it will take longer unless you have two pots and boil them at the same time… it’s a bit more management trying to keep the boils steady and stirring bot pots, but it is an alternative to boiling 6 gallons or increasing the frequency of your brewing…

If I were to double up on my batch size, that’s how I would do it until I get more equipment and bigger pots or kettles…


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