Greetings from Rancho ‘El Borracho’…

I was going over some old emails and I noticed one pattern… the #1 question I get is “is my beer ruined?”

… and going back through memories I can think of many times I’ve asked myself that question… especially since I turned into somewhat of an experimental brewer…

You know that time when you see a fruit fly get near your wort… you are close enough to see it, but too far to swat it away before it drowns itself to a happy death as you rack your head wondering if you just wasted an entire day brewing?

RIP little fella and thanks for not carrying lactobacillus… this time…

Well… stuff like that happens, and over time you learn to RDWHAHB… (Relax Don’t Worry Have a Home Brew)…

… and that’s how I slowly made the switch to experiment more with my brews…

I brewed a Belgian Dubbel a while back and decided to try something a bit different… adding the candi syrup after fermentation… thinking that if aroma does come from candi syrup, well why let CO2 drive off the aromatics?

Well… unfortunately, beet sugar seems to lose its fermentability when processed to become candi syrup…

Here’s the review on this home brew:

The FG was too high… I could definitely taste the sweet of unfermented sugar… So was my beer ruined?

Well, in my early days, I would’ve thought so and moved on… but now I know better…

I know when I can make a mistake and have room to fix the beer in case anything goes wrong…

I took the chance on this brew because I was kegging the beer… I knew the risk was that the sugar wouldn’t attenuate, and if that was the case, I could always re-pitch yeast…

I would not have done that if I planned on bottling the beer…

Now, its through these kind of experiments that I get questions and comments that bring about ideas and new advanced techniques…

In this case a new advanced brewing technique is developing which I am going to explore in further detail over the next few months…

You are getting the gist of it…

Essentially how to boost malt aroma in your brews…

Think about this for a second… if you add hops after fermentation (dry hop) you are doing so because fermentation drives off hop aroma… and you don’t want that…

You dry hop to get more hop aroma and flavor, right?

Well, adding candi syrup after fermentation had a similar effect… the aroma was intact and the beer turned out with a very strong ‘chocolate flavor’ from the candi syrup…

… and now my head is spinning with ideas on different ways I can exploit this info to improve other beer styles…

… and if you like the sound of improving your beer with little tips like this, then you should definitely check out our advanced training program Mash Controlâ„¢

The tips inside Mash Controlâ„¢ are proven and you are sure to find this one added and explained in more detail in the future after I’m done exploring the concept…

I am always looking to update my training programs and I have also uploaded new videos and a new ebook to Better Home Brew Formula…

The new ebook makes the last one look like a free report… if you haven’t already read it, I recommend you check it out… I made it easier to read, more to the point and with more tips…

Cheers!

http://youtu.be/UpnP5lQS7tI


    2 replies to "How to Increase Malt Aroma Experiment"

    • BobW

      “In this case a new advanced brewing technique is developing”
      Sorry this not really new,the Belgians have been doing this for ever. Adding sugars late in the process to preserve the rich malt aroma without getting a beer that is to Malty sweet.
      Cheers
      BobW

      • Jorge

        What I will be testing is NOT what the Belgians do and it’s something I can’t find information about…. Will it work? I don’t know, but if it does it will be different from anything most (any?) brewers have seen…

        As far as I know Belgians add sugars to dry out the beer… That does keep a beer from being too malty sweet, but it doesnn’t necessarily help preserve malt aroma… I brewed nothing but Belgians this summer and became very familiar with many of Their brewing processes none of which accomplish what I am after… Can you describe the process you are referring to…

        Cheers

        PS a great mentor once told me “never allow yourself to think you know or understand everything”

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